Tag Archives: J.K. Rowling

Review: The Silkworm (Cormoran Strike 02) by Robert Galbraith

Synopsis (from Goodreads): When novelist Owen Quine goes missing, his wife calls in private detective Cormoran Strike. At first, Mrs. Quine just thinks her husband has gone off by himself for a few days—as he has done before—and she wants … Continue reading

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The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith aka J.K. Rowling (Cormoran Strike 01)

Synopsis: A brilliant debut mystery in a classic vein: Detective Cormoran Strike investigates a supermodel’s suicide. After losing his leg to a land mine in Afghanistan, Cormoran Strike is barely scraping by as a private investigator. Strike is down to … Continue reading

Posted in book review, contemporary, crime, meh, rameau, read in 2013 | Tagged , , | 4 Comments

Review: The Cuckoo’s Calling (Cormoran Strike 01) by Robert Galbraith (a.k.a. J.K. Rowling)

Synopsis (from Goodreads): After losing his leg to a land mine in Afghanistan, Cormoran Strike is barely scraping by as a private investigator. Strike is down to one client, and creditors are calling. He has also just broken up with … Continue reading

Posted in book review, contemporary, crime | Tagged , | 9 Comments

Rameau’s Review Archive: The Casual Vacancy by J. K. Rowling

Originally posted on Goodreads January 31st 2013. Synopsis:A BIG NOVEL ABOUT A SMALL TOWN …When Barry Fairbrother dies in his early forties, the town of Pagford is left in shock.Pagford is, seemingly, an English idyll, with a cobbled market square … Continue reading

Posted in book review, one brilliant book, rameau, read in 2013 | Tagged | 12 Comments

Review: The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling

Book info: Kindle format Genre: Contemporary fiction Target audience: adults only  Synopsis: When Barry Fairbrother dies suddenly of aneurism in his early forties, leaving his family and a lot of unfinished issues behind, the town of Pagford is  in shock. … Continue reading

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